English

Welcome to the Spokane Falls English Department

English Department Faculty SFCC English Department

We are a group of dedicated faculty ready to learn with you as we read, write, and talk with you over the course of your studies with us. Consider enrolling in any of the classes we offer—from Basic Writing to Advanced Composition, from Shakespeare to Hurston, Kerouac to Morrison, Homer to Marquez, we look forward to opening a new page with you this quarter.

Composition Courses

SFCC’s Composition instructors strive to prepare students to write effectively in their college courses and the workplace. Our courses are geared to students at all levels of preparation. For more information about each course, and for a list of this quarter’s offerings, please click on the appropriate writing course.

SFCC’s writing courses offer all learners flexibility both in learning styles and in classroom style. We offer composition classes in a variety of classrooms:
  • Traditional classrooms
  • Computerized classrooms
  • Online
  • Through hybrid courses that take place in both physical and virtual classrooms
  • With the possibility of an H (Honors) designation (see American Honors College)

SFCC’s English Department is pleased to understand, and meet, the writing needs of this college’s diverse community.

How do I know which composition course is right for me? See Placement

By the completion of English 98, a student should be able to…

  • Brainstorm varied details to support a specific topic
  • Annotate a text in order to effectively summarize and respond to the ideas in that text
  • Discern and record specific details in light of particular rhetorical purposes to support claims
  • Respond thoughtfully to text
  • Organize ideas in a coherent manner
  • Practice writing that is a process requiring thoughtful reconsideration and revision
  • Improve prose through instructor, self, and peer feedback
  • Generate clear, grammatically correct prose
  • Submit original work by established deadlines
  • Gain justifiable confidence as writers of prose

By the completion of English 99, a student should be able to…

  • Brainstorm varied details and ideas to support a topic of appropriate scope for a given assignment
  • Annotate a text in order to effectively summarize, respond to, and apply the ideas in that text
  • Research, use, and document information to support a position
  • Discern and record relevant details in light of particular rhetorical purposes to support claims
  • Respond thoughtfully and precisely to texts
  • Communicate with an academic audience to describe, analyze, or persuade
  • Organize ideas in a coherent manner
  • Demonstrate writing that is a process requiring thoughtful reconsideration and revision
  • Improve prose through instructor, self, and peer feedback
  • Generate clear, grammatically correct prose
  • Submit original work meeting assignment requirements by established deadlines
  • Gain justifiable confidence as writers of prose

By the completion of English 101, students will be able to…

  • Brainstorm varied ideas to support a claim of manageable scope for a given assignment
  • Annotate a text in order to effectively analyze and evaluate the ideas in that text
  • Research, analyze, use, and document information and ideas to develop a position
  • Analyze, select, and record relevant, valid details in light of particular rhetorical purposes to support claims
  • Respond thoughtfully, precisely, and ethically to texts
  • Communicate with an academic audience to illustrate, analyze, or persuade
  • Organize ideas in a purposeful and coherent manner
  • Demonstrate writing that is a systematic process requiring thoughtful reconsideration and revision
  • Improve prose through instructor, self, and peer feedback
  • Generate clear, grammatically correct prose
  • Apply conventions of a particular documentation style
  • Independently create original work meeting assignment requirements

By the completion of English 102, students will be able to…

  • Identify a claim of supportable scope for a given assignment
  • Annotate a text in order to effectively analyze and evaluate the ideas in that text
  • Research, evaluate, use, and document information to develop an argument
  • Composition 102 student
  • Analyze and select appropriate primary and secondary sources in light of particular rhetorical purposes to support claims
  • Create an inter-textual response that is thoughtful and ethical
  • Communicate with an academic audience to illustrate, evaluate or persuade
  • Organize ideas in a logical, purposeful, and coherent manner
  • Engage in reconsideration and revision as an integral part of academic writing.
  • Improve prose through self, instructor and peer feedback
  • Generate clear, grammatically correct prose
  • Apply conventions of a particular documentation style

By the completion of English 105, students will be able to…

  • Clearly convey information to a targeted audience according to conventions of a variety of professional and technical forms
  • Produce clear descriptions and definitions as the writing task requires
  • Composition 105 student
  • Gauge effectiveness of information sources, such as web sites and promotional texts
  • Develop strategies for information design, to include producing visually enhanced documents
  • Summarize larger texts in clear, direct style for practical applications
  • Edit documents with peer exchange and according to career-technical guidelines
  • Write clear, grammatically correct sentences and organized paragraphs and lists appropriate to career-technical fields

Prerequisite: ENGL 099 or permission of instructor.

By the completion of English 235, students will be able to…

  • Clearly convey specialized information from a technical field to a non-specialized audience
  • Identify and use appropriate formats and conventions derived from individual disciplines
  • Composition 235 student
  • Assess effectiveness and validity of information sources, such as web sites, business documents, and professional journals
  • Develop strategies for information design, to include producing visually enhanced documents
  • Summarize larger texts in clear, direct style for practical applications
  • Design and produce a research project appropriate to the student's major and/or career interests
  • Edit documents with peer exchange and according to professional guidelines


*For information regarding this and other developmental writing courses, visit Spokane Falls College Literacy Center.

Placement

  'How do I know which composition course is right for me?'

Every incoming student must take the COMPASS English test, unless he or she:
  • Has previous college-level English credits to transfer into SFCC
  • Has completed an assessment within the last three years
  • Is not pursuing a degree or certificate and will not be enrolling in English courses
Prepare for the COMPASS English test: Challenge the COMPASS results: “I took the Compass but want to challenge the results and try to get placed in the next highest composition class.”

Great! Contact the Testing Center and find out the next time they’re proctoring the challenge essay. The essay will be assessed anonymously by an SFCC composition instructor.



Answers

Want to polish your essay for your instructor? Meet with a peer tutor!

Need more, or better, research? Have a question related to your essay writing?
Barbara Simmons Photo Barbara Simmons,
Director of Composition
Want to know more about SFCC’s Composition Courses?

Literature Courses

With the help of our expert faculty, students in literature classes build critical reading and writing skills as they encounter the world’s finest fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction. Through the lens of literature, students come to terms with fundamental questions about life and what it means to be human.

Why Study Literature at SFCC?

From Song of Myself, Walt Whitman
  • Many of our literature courses satisfy W (Writing Intensive), D (Diversity) and Humanities requirements for graduation.
  • For more information about each course, and for a list of this quarter’s offerings, please click on the appropriate literature course listed on the left; for a quick view of all course titles, please click on the appropriate tab above.

By the completion of English 111, a student should be able to…

  • Understand the conventions of the basic forms of literature: poetry, fiction, and/or drama
  • Identify and analyze such elements of literature as imagery, diction, figurative language, symbolism, point of view, setting, tone, and theme
  • Form individual interpretations of the literature and evaluate these interpretations (and those of classmates) for validity
  • Organize information to develop and support ideas gleaned from reading, discussing, and evaluating the literature
  • Clearly and logically synthesize and articulate individual positions on issues presented in the literature to others in both written and oral modes
  • Find appropriate methods of communicating disagreement regarding ideas about and interpretations of the literature without stereotyping or being ethnocentrically biased or offensive

When students complete English 112, they should be able to…

  • Recognize and use the vocabulary of literary analysis (plot, setting, character, theme, point of view, style)
  • Apply vocabulary to familiar and new works of fiction
  • Talk comfortably and disagree in a small group about their understanding of fiction
  • Make inferences about fiction that rest on textual evidence and logical consistency
  • Converse about fiction from an earlier era or a foreign context orally or in writing

When students complete English 113, they should be able to…

  • Identify and analyze such elements of poetry as imagery, diction, figurative language, symbolism, tone, and themet
  • Use the language and techniques of poetry analysis when discussing poetry
  • Explicate individual poems to explore meaning
  • Form individual interpretations of poems and evaluate these interpretations and those of classmates for validity
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how individual poems fit into the history of poetry
  • Develop an appreciation for the skill and creativity of individual poets

When students complete English 114, they should be able to…

A Dolls House book cover illustration
  • Identify and analyze elements of dramatic literature such as character, plot, dialogue, symbolism, and staging.
  • Use the language and techniques of theatrical analysis when discussing plays.
  • Identify and discuss the complicated relationship between written text and performance.
  • Form individual interpretations of plays and evaluate these interpretations and those of classmates for validity.
  • Demonstrate awareness of how plays represent a collaboration between writers, actors, directors, and others, as well as how the staging of a play is itself an interpretive act.
  • Articulate the contribution of individual playwrights to the development of the dramatic genre.
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of and appreciation for drama as literature.
  • Identify common or culturally specific themes in drama as literature by writers of different races, genders, and ethnic backgrounds.
Lysistrata book cover illustration Night Mother book cover illustration a raisin in the sun book cover illustration

When students complete English 208, they should be able to…


  • Understand the historical context surrounding literary works including the political, social, religious, and artistic milieu in which early British authors wrote (Anglo-Saxons to the Neo-Classicists)
  • Paraphrase and understand unfamiliar and difficult language
  • Identify elements of poetry such as basic rhythms, meters, and rhyme schemes; uses of metaphor; the conventions of the sonnet and other poetic forms
  • Identify the elements of prose genres (fiction, drama, satire): plot, setting, character, theme, irony, and argument
  • In classroom conversation, make inferences about literature that rest on textual evidence and logic
  • Articulate a critical position or interpretation; gather and use textual or critical evidence to support a particular interpretation
  • Appreciate the artistry of key early British writers
  • Understand the influences of a variety of cultures on the development of early British literature

Prerequisite: ENGL 099 or permission of instructor.

When students complete English 209, they should be able to…


Virginia Woolf
James Joyce statue in
St. Stephens Green, Dublin
  • Understand the historical context surrounding literary works including the political, social, religious, and artistic milieu in which Romantic, Victorian, and modern British authors wrote (1795 – 1990s)
  • Paraphrase and understand unfamiliar and difficult language
  • Identify elements of poetry such as basic rhythms, meters, and rhyme schemes; uses of metaphor; the conventions of the sonnet and other poetic formsCompose effective business messages in various standard formats
  • Identify the elements of prose genres (fiction, drama, satire): plot, setting, character, theme, irony, and argument
  • In classroom conversation, make inferences about literature that rest on textual evidence and logic
  • Articulate a critical position or interpretation; gather and use textual or critical evidence to support a particular interpretation/li>
  • Appreciate the artistry of individual British authors writing between 1795 and the present
  • Understand how the expanse of the British Empire has helped create a lively postcolonial literature

When students complete English 220, they should be able to…


Who steals my purse steals trash; 'tis something, nothing; 'Twas mine, 'tis his, and has been slave to thousands; But he that filches from me my good name Robs me of that which not enriches him, And makes me poor indeed
~ Othello: Act 3, Scene 3, 155–161
  • Develop strategies for understanding Shakespeare’s language
  • Recognize blank verse; perform basic scansion
  • Recognize patterns of imagery and metaphor
  • Know the basic facts of Shakespeare’s life
  • Understand the historical context of Shakespeare’s works, including the political, social, religious, and artistic milieu in which Shakespeare wrote
  • Recognize the dramatic conventions that obtained in Elizabethan theatre
  • Know the details of theatre architecture and theatrical practice
  • Develop the ability to analyze plot, character, and theme through close reading of the texts
  • Make inferences about Shakespeare’s view of human values, human nature, and the human condition
  • Articulate a critical position or an interpretation; gather and use textual and/or critical evidence to convincingly support the validity of a particular position or interpretation
  • Recognize the universal aspects of Shakespeare; see the connections between Shakespeare’s world and ours

When students complete English 247, they should be able to…

  • Use the language and techniques of literary criticism when analyzing contemporary multicultural American literature
  • Form individual interpretations of the literature and evaluate these interpretations (and those of classmates) for validity
  • Develop an appreciation of the skill and creativity of diverse authors of American literature
  • Draw justifiable inferences about other races or cultures without stereotyping or ethnocentric bias through the study of diverse authors of American literature
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the United States as a racially and culturally diverse society as expressed through its literature
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of other expressions of diversity such as class, gender, sexual orientation, or religion
  • Develop awareness of the influence of racially or culturally based assumptions on perception and behavior
  • Develop awareness of the implications of race or culture when looking at moral problems and societal conflicts in American literature
  • Listen to and understand individuals and respond respectfully to their points of view

When students complete English 248, they should be able to…


By night when others soundly slept/ And hath at once both ease and Rest,/ My waking eyes were open kept/ And so to lie I found it best.
-Anne Bradstreet
  • Demonstrate skill in analyzing elements of literature such as plot, character, setting, tone, point of view, symbol, irony and theme
  • Use the language and techniques of literary criticism when discussing American literature
  • Recognize and respect the diversity of individual and cultural values depicted in literature
  • Develop an appreciation for the skill and creativity of individual authors of American literature
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history and development of American literature to 1865
  • Recognize the historical, social, and cultural contexts of American literature to 1865

When students complete English 249, they should be able to…



  • Use the language and techniques of literary criticism when analyzing American literature
  • Develop an appreciation of the skill and creativity of diverse authors of American literature
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history and development of American literature from the Civil War to the present through historical, social, racial, and cultural contexts
  • Demonstrate an understanding of varying racial/cultural customs and values as depicted in American literature
  • Draw justifiable inferences about other races or cultures without stereotyping of ethnocentric bias through the study of diverse authors of American literature
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the United States as a racially and culturally diverse society as expressed through its literature
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of other expressions of diversity such as class, gender, sexual orientation, and/or religion in American literature
  • Develop awareness of the influence of racially or culturally based assumptions on perception and behavior
  • Develop awareness of the implications of race or culture when looking at moral problems and societal conflicts since 1860 in American literature
  • Listen to and understand individuals and respond respectfully to their points of view

When students complete English 259, they should be able to…

  • Have a vocabulary and a repertoire of techniques for interpreting African American literature
  • Understand the achievement and influence of major African American writers
  • Understand the ways in which African American writers have responded to, and interpreted, their predecessors (both African American and not)
  • Situate African American literature in cultural and historical context
  • Identify, and take an informed position on, current issues and debates within the field of African American literature
  • Identify and analyze connections between African American literature and other fields of human activity such as music, art, and history
  • Identify ways in which attitudes about race, including racism, have shaped American literary history and American culture

When students complete English 261, they should be able to…

  • Describe the conventions of the novel as a literary form
  • Identify and analyze such elements of longer fiction as plot, sub-plot, symbolism, point of view, setting, tone, and theme
  • Form individual interpretations of the literature and evaluate these interpretations (and those of classmates) for validity
  • Organize information to develop and support ideas gleaned from reading, discussing, and evaluating the literature
  • Clearly and logically synthesize and articulate individual positions on issues presented in the literature to others in both written and oral modes
  • Find appropriate methods of communicating disagreement regarding ideas about and interpretations of the literature without stereotyping or being ethnocentrically biased or offensive

When students complete English 271, they should be able to…

  • Write clear and thoughtful analyses of readings and cultural history
  • Discuss readings and contexts in small and large groups
  • Identify, locate, and access potential sources of information on authors, works, and cultures studied, including Ancient and Medieval Middle East and North Africa; Classical Mediterranean; Medieval and Renaissance Europe
  • Demonstrate responsibility for attendance, preparation for discussion of readings, regular completion of discussion papers
  • Identify similar and dissimilar values within works of varying cultures and periods
  • Discuss civilly the depictions of race and religion in the works studied
  • Articulate understanding and appreciation of achievements of competing cultural groups
  • Consider the past’s influence on and relevance to contemporary beliefs, conflicts, and achievements
  • Demonstrate understanding and appreciation of seminal religious and literary texts of Middle Eastern and Mediterranean and European cultures
  • Use comparative literary and cultural analysis to understand and appreciate readings from many cultures
  • Demonstrate comprehension of elements of tradition and change within literature
  • Increase understanding of human condition
  • Encounter racial and cultural perspectives beyond the dominant culture of the US through reading literary works of many cultures over many centuries
  • Identify the influence of racially and culturally biased assumptions on the perceptions and behaviors of literary characters
  • Identify the influence of racially and culturally biased assumptions on authors
  • Discuss the implications of race and culture for the moral problems and societal conflicts reflected in the readings
  • Analyze the non-western foundations of Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, and European cultures
  • Illustrate the persistence of pre-western ethnic cultures in European literature
  • Discuss the importance of conflict with non-western cultures for the ongoing definition of European cultures, especially Christendom’s conflicts with paganism, Judaism and Islam
  • Appreciate the vast range of differing cultural experiences based on race, class, sex, gender, sexuality and religion depicted in the readings
  • Demonstrate understanding of varying cultural customs and values reflected in the readings
  • Draw justifiable inferences about races and/or cultures studied without stereotyping or ethnocentric bias
  • Listen to and understand individuals and respond respectfully to their points of view

When students complete English 272, they should be able to…


  • Show increased understanding of the global human condition, today and over the last 350 years
  • Demonstrate understanding and appreciation of landmark Western and Nonwestern texts
  • Recognize similar and dissimilar values within works of varying cultures and periods
  • Appreciate the abundance and diversity of literature within the Western tradition from the Seventeenth to the Nineteenth Centuries
  • Recognize the persistence of Nonwestern literary traditions during this period of European colonial dominance
  • Trace the emergence of a genuinely global literature during the Twentieth Century, The Post-Colonial Era
  • Appreciate the frequent mutual indebtedness of competing cultural groups
  • Discuss patterns of influence and conflict within and between literary traditions
  • Connect the literature studied to literary movements including Rationalism, Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, Post-Colonialism, Post-Modernism
  • Discuss civilly the depictions of race, religion, class and gender in the works studied
  • Recognize the impact of racial bias on the literature and history of recent centuries and acknowledge efforts to overcome racial bias
  • Consider the global context of contemporary American culture and the impact of both the world on America and America on the world
  • Demonstrate responsibility for attendance, preparation for discussion of readings, and regular completion of writing assignments

When students complete English 278, they should be able to…

  • Demonstrate skill in analyzing elements of literature such as plot, character, setting, tone, point of view, symbol, irony and theme
  • Use the language and techniques of literary criticism when discussing literature by women
  • Recognize and respect the diversity of individual and cultural values depicted in literature by women
  • Develop an appreciation for the skill and creativity of individual women authors
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the history and development of literature written by women
  • Recognize the historical, social, and cultural contexts of literature written by women
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the artistic and intellectual contributions of women to literature
Students analyze, discuss and write about the literature of a particular genre, author or period. The course content varies and may include the following: Classical mythology, contemporary novels, mystery or crime fiction, historical novels, Western fiction, women writers, and Black and Chicano literature. The emphasis of each course is understanding the themes, conventions and techniques of the writers within the genre. The aim is to assist students in recognizing the ways in which literature reflects and challenges the values of its audience. Course may be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: ENGL& 101, grade of 2.0 or above; or permission of instructor. SFCC only: Recommended minimum reading placement score: COMPASS 80, ASSET 40.


Looking for Answers regarding our literature courses?

Please direct questions regarding our literature courses to Ryan Simmons, Lead Literature Instructor or to Laura Read, the interim Lead Literature Instructor for Winter and Spring 2013.


Email: Ryan.Simmons@spokanefalls.edu
Office: 5-159
Phone: 533-3614

Email: Laura.Read@spokanefalls.edu
Office: 24-312
Phone: 533-4173

AUTHOR FOCUS

ZORA NEALE HURSTON

Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) was one of the most vibrant, poetic, and controversial novelists in twentieth-century America. She also may be the most striking example of a writer whose reputation was rescued from obscurity after her death. During the “Harlem Renaissance” of the 1920s and ‘30s, Hurston (who was trained as an anthropologist) lovingly captured the poetic language and dramatic stories of the people of Eatonville, Florida, one of the nation’s only all-black towns. She was determined to bring new voices and experiences into literature. Although her books were successful at first, by the 1950s they had gone out of print, and Hurston was reduced to working as a maid near the end of her life. In the 1970s and ‘80s, however, devoted fans, including the novelist Alice Walker, helped bring Hurston’s writing back into the limelight. Today, her novels and stories are among the most frequently discussed in college classrooms and literary journals.

Starting Place: Their Eyes Were Watching God (novel, 1937)

Quotable:“She was stretched on her back beneath the pear tree soaking in the alto chant of the visiting bees, the gold of the sun and the panting breath of the breeze when the inaudible voice of it all came to her. She saw a dust-bearing bee sink into the sanctum of a bloom, the thousand sister-calyxes arch to meet the love embrace and the ecstatic shiver of the tree from root to tiniest branch creaming in every blossom and frothing with delight. So this was marriage! She had been summoned to behold a revelation” (Their Eyes Were Watching God).

To learn more:You can learn more about Hurston and other great American writers in courses like: English 249 (American Literature since 1865) and English 259 (African American Literature).

Class Credits
ENGL 249American Literature since 1865 5.0
ENGL 259African American Literature 5.0

Used under Creative Commons License, Ninha Morandini

LIT UP!

SFCC's Student Literature Club

If you like to read, Lit Up! is a place to meet like-minded people, have fun, and discuss good books. The club selects a new book for its Book Club at least once each quarter, as well as screening movies and attending literary and non-literary events. We also give back to the community by conducting an annual book drive for the Airway Heights Correctional Facility. We welcome those with interests in all styles and genres of writing.

  • We meet Fridays at 1:00 in Building 5, room 117
  • Advisor: Ryan Simmons, ryans@spokanefalls.edu
  • Visit us on Facebook
  • LitUp! is on hiatus during Winter and Spring 2013, but will return to active sessions in Fall 2013. Stay tuned!

ENGL& 236/237, Creative Writing (5 cr.)

Creative Writing students explore the resources of their imaginations, sharpen their writing and verbal skills, all while reading a wide range of poetry, creative nonfiction and fiction-and creating their own individual works. Students also have the opportunity to meet nationally recognized writers, through Wire Harp: LitLive!, a visiting writers program that hosts a professional writer once each academic year, usually in winter quarter.


Creative Writing courses are taught by professional poets and prose writers who are dedicated to the craft of writing and the appreciation of imaginative work that spans all literary genres.

Please visit the online homes of our ASG and IRP clubs, The Creative Writing Club and The Wire Harp Club. Creative Writing students and faculty are encouraged to submit their work to The Wire Harp , SFCC’s creative arts magazine.

The class offerings for creative writing are as follows:
Class Credits
ENGL& 236Creative Writing I 5.0
ENGL& 237Creative Writing II 5.0

English Clubs at SFCC

The Creative Writitng Club
Activities Students write, discuss writing, and enjoy each other’s company and coffee. Students promote writing around campus and Spokane. We attend the readings of visiting writers at least once a month.
Meetings: Thursday, 1:00 - 2:00 (24-307)
Website: http://wecreativewriters.blogspot.com
Advisor: Erin Toungate
Phone: (509) 533-4186

The Wire Harp Club

Activities The Wire Harp is our campus’s literary journal. Student staff put the magazine together from start to finish—from soliciting submissions, to evaluating the work, to advertising and training new staff. A coffeehouse reading and art show is held each May, at 11:30 at the SUB, when the new issue of the magazine debuts. Stay tuned to your campus activity calendars for our next show.
Meetings: Intermittent Friday Meetings, 1:00-2:30
Advisors: Connie Scott & Laura Read
Phone: (509) 533-3670 & (509) 533-4173

Visit our tables in the SUB on Club Day
Wire Harp Logo 2010/2011
Wire Harp Logo 2009/2010
Wire Harp 2011/2013 logo
The Wire Harp creative arts magazine, spokane falls community college logo
Black and white image of rocks sand and water

When The Tell Me It's Alzheimer's by Robin Golke

The drill bit is breaking & i have to make words of it

Your wedding band is cut from your delicate finger; they give you pills that make you shuffle & i have to make words of it

i'm searching with a seething rage that's male, hopeless, bare to the waist.

i'm as lost as you were when you kissed my dead father in his casket.

i've smashed every photo, burned everything i've ever written, spat at my graceful prose.

My confused tears fall on memories of you bathing me in the sink.

Gratefully, i would remove my own entrails & read their pearly scroll if only for an answer: why you mother?

You are vacuous, you leave me with clenched muscles. My two brothers fall away.


To read the current and past issues, please visit us online at graphicdesign.spokanefalls.edu/wireharp/index.htm

To pick up a print copy, visit various locations on campus, or the bookshelves in the study area in Building 24, near office 312.

What was your favorite piece? We’d love to know! Tell us on our Facebook page:

College Literacy Center

Bldg. 5 Room 113
(509) 533-3604
8:30am - 2:00pm

The College Literacy Center is here for you

Many students entering college or returning after an extended absence from studies need additional work to prepare for college-level courses. To meet the needs of these students, SFCC offers Developmental Education courses in traditional classroom format and through individualized, self-paced instruction in the CLC. These courses are numbered below 100 and, although taken for credit, are nontransferable.

Students enroll in the CLC in one of three ways:

English 93 includes practice with college preparatory skills, habits, and sensibilities. When students complete English 93, they should be able to…

  • Identify appropriate learning strategies for various learning situations
  • Apply this knowledge to actual learning situations
  • Self-assess the quality of the application of the strategies
  • Become more meta-cognitive
  • Become more responsible for own learning

Read Right

  • This instructional program enables students to improve their reading skills in a relatively brief amount of time.

The Process

  • The unit begins with an individual consultation. Students are then placed at a comfortable but challenging reading level. In small groups, students individually engage with audio recordings of written passages. The session also includes coached reading. Once a week, groups engage in a critical thinking activity with their lead tutor.

By the completion of English 98, a student should be able to…

  • Brainstorm varied details to support a specific topic
  • Annotate a text in order to effectively summarize and respond to the ideas in that text
  • Discern and record specific details in light of particular rhetorical purposes to support claims
  • Respond thoughtfully to texts
  • Organize ideas in a coherent manner
  • Practice writing that is a process requiring thoughtful reconsideration and revision
  • Improve prose through instructor, self, and peer feedback
  • Generate clear, grammatically correct prose
  • Submit original work by established deadlines
  • Gain justifiable confidence as writers of prose

By the completion of English 104, students will be able to…

  • Recognize the constituent elements of a sentence
  • Develop grammatical correctness in key concepts: subject-verb agreement, pronoun-antecedent agreement, and pronoun case
  • Identify and use most common marks of punctuation (period, comma, colon, semicolon, apostrophe)
  • Demonstrate standard grammar and punctuation use in original writing

When students complete English 152, they should have…

  • Increase Reading Rate
  • Developed reading rate flexibility
  • Developed previewing strategies
  • Developed strategies for reading a wide variety of topics and genres


CLC STUDENTS

For over two decades, SFCC students have completed reading, writing, and study skills courses in the CLC and have continued on in their college-level courses feeling prepared and supported. Here are some recent student comments from end-of-quarter surveys:

  • “I am very impressed with the CLC. I liked how it was at our own pace and independent…I got a better understanding of how to take tests, take notes, and how to improve memory.”
  • “The improved learning and organizing techniques I have learned are essential, important, and are already helping me in other areas of school an everyday life.”
  • “Because of this course and the instructors, my ability to write has increased tenfold.”
  • “I feel like my writing confidence has greatly improved because of the instructors’ continuous help and feedback.”
  • “I liked working in the CLC and with my instructors. I always felt welcome. I am excited to come back next quarter and learn more that will help me for the future.”
  • “Time management! This was a great unit for me to do; it helped me understand how important time is and how much I should use free time wisely instead of misusing it. I like how time management has somewhat changed my life around.”
(The above comments are samples of answers to student survey in the 2010-2011 academic year.)

Answers

Have a question related to the College Literacy Center?

Contact: Christie Anderson, Director of the CLC
Email: Christie.Anderson@spokanefalls.edu
Phone: (509) 533-3612