English

Composition Courses

SFCC's Composition instructors strive to prepare students to write effectively in their college courses and the workplace. Our courses are geared to students at all levels of preparation. For more information about each course, and for a list of this quarter's offerings, please click on the appropriate writing course.

SFCC's writing courses offer all learners flexibility both in learning styles and in classroom style. We offer composition classes in a variety of classrooms: Building 24
  • Traditional classrooms
  • Computerized classrooms
  • Online
  • Through hybrid courses that take place in both physical and virtual classrooms
  • With the possibility of an H (Honors) designation (see American Honors College)

SFCC's English Department is pleased to understand, and meet, the writing needs of this college's diverse community.

How do I know which composition course is right for me? See Placement

By the completion of English 98, a student should be able to…

English 98 student
  • Brainstorm varied details to support a specific topic
  • Annotate a text in order to effectively summarize and respond to the ideas in that text
  • Discern and record specific details in light of particular rhetorical purposes to support claims
  • Respond thoughtfully to text
  • Organize ideas in a coherent manner
  • Practice writing that is a process requiring thoughtful reconsideration and revision
  • Improve prose through instructor, self, and peer feedback
  • Generate clear, grammatically correct prose
  • Submit original work by established deadlines
  • Gain justifiable confidence as writers of prose

By the completion of English 99, a student should be able to…

  • Brainstorm varied details and ideas to support a topic of appropriate scope for a given assignment
  • Annotate a text in order to effectively summarize, respond to, and apply the ideas in that text
  • Research, use, and document information to support a position
  • Discern and record relevant details in light of particular rhetorical purposes to support claims
  • Respond thoughtfully and precisely to texts
  • Communicate with an academic audience to describe, analyze, or persuade
  • Organize ideas in a coherent manner
  • Demonstrate writing that is a process requiring thoughtful reconsideration and revision
  • Improve prose through instructor, self, and peer feedback
  • Generate clear, grammatically correct prose
  • Submit original work meeting assignment requirements by established deadlines
  • Gain justifiable confidence as writers of prose

By the completion of English 101, students will be able to…

  • Brainstorm varied ideas to support a claim of manageable scope for a given assignment
  • Annotate a text in order to effectively analyze and evaluate the ideas in that text
  • Research, analyze, use, and document information and ideas to develop a position
  • Analyze, select, and record relevant, valid details in light of particular rhetorical purposes to support claims
  • Respond thoughtfully, precisely, and ethically to texts
  • Communicate with an academic audience to illustrate, analyze, or persuade
  • Organize ideas in a purposeful and coherent manner
  • Demonstrate writing that is a systematic process requiring thoughtful reconsideration and revision
  • Improve prose through instructor, self, and peer feedback
  • Generate clear, grammatically correct prose
  • Apply conventions of a particular documentation style
  • Independently create original work meeting assignment requirements

By the completion of English 102, students will be able to…

Composition 102 student
  • Identify a claim of supportable scope for a given assignment
  • Annotate a text in order to effectively analyze and evaluate the ideas in that text
  • Research, evaluate, use, and document information to develop an argument
  • Analyze and select appropriate primary and secondary sources in light of particular rhetorical purposes to support claims
  • Create an inter-textual response that is thoughtful and ethical
  • Communicate with an academic audience to illustrate, evaluate or persuade
  • Organize ideas in a logical, purposeful, and coherent manner
  • Engage in reconsideration and revision as an integral part of academic writing.
  • Improve prose through self, instructor and peer feedback
  • Generate clear, grammatically correct prose
  • Apply conventions of a particular documentation style

By the completion of English 105, students will be able to…

Composition 105 student
  • Clearly convey information to a targeted audience according to conventions of a variety of professional and technical forms
  • Produce clear descriptions and definitions as the writing task requires
  • Gauge effectiveness of information sources, such as web sites and promotional texts
  • Develop strategies for information design, to include producing visually enhanced documents
  • Summarize larger texts in clear, direct style for practical applications
  • Edit documents with peer exchange and according to career-technical guidelines
  • Write clear, grammatically correct sentences and organized paragraphs and lists appropriate to career-technical fields

Prerequisite: ENGL 099 or permission of instructor.

By the completion of English 235, students will be able to…

Composition 235 student
  • Clearly convey specialized information from a technical field to a non-specialized audience
  • Identify and use appropriate formats and conventions derived from individual disciplines
  • Assess effectiveness and validity of information sources, such as web sites, business documents, and professional journals
  • Develop strategies for information design, to include producing visually enhanced documents
  • Summarize larger texts in clear, direct style for practical applications
  • Design and produce a research project appropriate to the student's major and/or career interests
  • Edit documents with peer exchange and according to professional guidelines


*For information regarding this and other developmental writing courses, visit Spokane Falls College Literacy Center.

Placement

  'How do I know which composition course is right for me?'

Every incoming student must take the COMPASS English test, unless he or she:
  • Has previous college-level English credits to transfer into SFCC
  • Has completed an assessment within the last three years
  • Is not pursuing a degree or certificate and will not be enrolling in English courses
Placement Testing
Prepare for the COMPASS English test: Challenge the COMPASS results: “I took the Compass but want to challenge the results and try to get placed in the next highest composition class.”

Great! Contact the Testing Center and find out the next time they're proctoring the challenge essay. The essay will be assessed anonymously by an SFCC composition instructor.



Answers

Want to polish your essay for your instructor? Meet with a peer tutor!

Need more, or better, research? Have a question related to your essay writing?
Barbara Simmons Photo Barbara Simmons,
Director of Composition
Want to know more about SFCC's Composition Courses?